December 19, 2012

The Handy Helpful Handbook: A Parent’s Guide to Drug & Gang Prevention

Judul : The Handy Helpful Handbook: A Parent’s Guide to Drug & Gang Prevention
Pengarang : www.drugfreeAZ.com
Penerbit : www.drugfreeAZ.com

If your child is using drugs:

Facts First:

• Begin by asking questions and gathering facts. Speak with your child’s friend, teachers, coach, school counselor, or employers. Get specific: how much, how often, and how long have they been using.
• Tray to get a sense of how deeply your child is involved. Do most of the “Signs and Symptoms” fit? Meet with a local drug and alcohol counselor to discuss your situation.
• Agree on a course of action with your spouse or other adult in the household before talking with your child. Consider options you are willing to offer, such as new family rules or a written contract spelling out conditions your child must meet.

Tough Love

• Set aside time for meeting with your child. Discuss what you’ve learned so far, ask more questions, talk about feelings – yours and your child’s. Remember that they’re frightened, too.
• Discuss your new conditions and consequences, which should include a rule on no further drug and alcohol use.
• Consider outside support for your child – and yourself. Self-help groups (such as Alcoholics Anonymous), ministers, and school counselors are helpful, as well as outpatient drug and alcohol centers.